>> Eat the World Los Angeles

Tuesday, 25 January 2022

Carnes Asadas Pancho Lopez

MÉXICO 🇲🇽
(JALISCO)
Pasadena Avenue facade

COVID-19 UPDATE: The dining room is a well-covered patio with open windows to each side and good ventilation.


Sometime during your first visit to the original Carnes Asadas Pancho Lopez, maybe around the time your agua fresca arrives at the table before a meal, you start to appreciate the surroundings enough to know that it will be your goal to become a regular here. The covered patio, corrugated metals, decoration and atmosphere are about as transportive and comfortable as possible, a direct flight to a sunny Guadalajara day via a short trip to Lincoln Heights.

Only serving breakfast and lunch, the restaurant is a colorful beacon that is easy-to-spot on speedy Pasadena Avenue, its red metal awnings extended to the street during opening hours. Pancho Lopez is not the name of the proprietor, but rather an ode to a song by a beloved and recently deceased clown from México known simply as Cepillín. A note thanking him for making "millions of Mexicans happy" graces the menu.

Hand made clay cups holding aguas frescas

Carnes Asadas Pancho Lopez is one of the rare places that strongly maintains a full five stars in reviews no matter where you look, a place untouched so far by the narcissistic Yelp "Elite." But you will find a mixture of the old and new faces of Lincoln Heights and Highland Park eating here when you visit, both enjoying everything in front of them equally. The now almost 4-year old restaurant has been enough of a hit that they recently expanded to a second location in City of Industry more easily accessible to Tapatíos in the eastern San Gabriel Valley.

If you have ever visited Jalisco and enjoyed the next door cities of Guadalajara and Tlaquepaque (Nahuatl for "place above clay land"), you will further enjoy the restaurant when dishes start arriving in front of you. All the colorfully painted lead-free pottery cups, plates, and bowls you saw in the dozens of shops and wanted to bring back home are used here and sometimes personalized.

Carne en su jugo

And besides all that shopping, memories from trips will naturally revolve around meals at Karne Garibaldi or one of many other specialists of carne en su jugo ($14.99, above), a Tapatío favorite. This "meat in its juice" is just that and much more, combined with bacon, beans, onions, and a tomatillo broth sharpened by lime juice. The combination of everything is simple and exhilarating at the same time somehow, a comforting dish to satisfy any mood.

Carne en su jugo can be found here and there in Los Angeles but is still somewhat of a special treat and really worth coming for even if you do not want anything else. The version here is one of if not the best in town. A packet of rolled tortillas arrives alongside, but these are meant for dipping if desired, not to try and make tacos from the soup. Don't be that guy.

Torta ahogada

Another meal that is hard to avoid on trips to the Jalisciense capital is a torta ahogada ($9.99, above), a sandwich "drowned" in salsa. The torta absolutely must use a firm birote salado so that it still has a crunch after getting wet, a simple bolillo or other type of softer bread does not do the trick. Just like in the open-air restaurants of Guadalajara that specialize in the sandwich, make sure to order an horchata or other agua fresca because the chile de arbol singed tomato salsa is going to burn if made properly.

While you can get other offerings, generally a torta ahogado is filled with a tough and chewy carnitas as it is here, pork meat that has also been slicked with the fiery salsa. There are onions and lime to throw on to alter the zip as desired, and do not feel bad using the knife and fork that it comes with.

Tacos de barbacoa estilo Guadalajara

The biggest surprise at Carnes Asadas Pancho Lopez might came from the smallest package with an order of tacos de barbacoa estilo Guadalajara ($2.99 each, above and below). While not necessarily a barbacoa specialist, these tacos are delicious and done very well. The outside tortilla is fried and crispy, and the tacos are served with a side of pickled onions that are very spicy.

After trying the restaurant's chilaquiles for breakfast, a future visit might just order a plate of these so they can be enjoyed on their own.

Tacos de barbacoa estilo Guadalajara

Birria en consomé

Guadalajara and its surrounding suburbs are filled with birrierias which fill with families early in the day, but in Jalisco goat is king when it comes to this dish. This Lincoln Heights restaurant has chosen beef to go in its birria en consomé ($14.99, above), maybe more of a reflection on what is hot in Los Angeles for the last few years.

The good news is that this is not the boring, glowing-red slop that is unfortunately offered at many of the city's imposter birria trucks, this is a complex stew with delicious cuts of meat and consomé. A squirt of lime and the dish hits almost every surface of the tongue in a positive way.

Quesadilla a mano de carnitas

When a quesadilla with a handmade corn tortilla is offered on a menu next to others with packaged ones, it is often hard to resist because it shows a place is proud of the former. Here the quesadilla a mano ($9.99, above) is more proof of this, stuffed with plenty of the meat or vegetables of your choosing and falling out of its wrapper with cheese, lettuce, and cream.

Carnitas is a good option for this again, prepared more traditionally smooth and full of oil and fat. No matter if you come here just for antojitos like this and the tacos, or prefer more complex platters of Guadalajara specialties, satisfaction is going to result.

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I COULD USE YOUR HELP
Eat the World Los Angeles is and always has been free. It is a hobby born of passion and never solicits money or free food from restaurants. No advertisements block the content or pop over what you read. If this website has helped you explore your city and its wonderful cultures a little better please tell your friends about us and if you have the means to contribute, please consider doing so. Eat the World Los Angeles is a labor of love, but also takes a lot of money and time everyday to keep running.

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Sunday, 23 January 2022

Bagan Burmese Kitchen

MYANMAR 🇲🇲
A full takeout order

COVID-19 UPDATE: This business is delivery and takeout only and exists with other ghost kitchens at one location. Pickup is a pretty simple process, but the lobby can be crowded.


With the exception of Yoma Myanmar, Los Angeles is not blessed with many amazing Burmese restaurants like Daly City and its surrounds in South San Francisco. When something new opens, it of course gets everyone's hopes up as it should, but rarely is the food doing the recipes from back home justice.

A new ghost kitchen on Western Avenue in the far western reaches of East Hollywood has recently opened with the promising name referencing magical Bagan. Its menu is thorough with the usual offerings of salads, curries, and noodle dishes, which are all customarily eaten at room temperature in Myanmar.

Paratha with curry chicken
Paratha with curry chicken ($10).

Unfortunately the chefs here have decided not to trust Angelenos with the real ingredients that go into Burmese food that make it unique. Almost all the parts are there, but the foods in that country have a very positive funk that comes from a lot of shrimp paste and some other things that just are not in the dishes here.

Even the fermented tea leaves in the tea leaf salad (below) seem to be unfermented. The portion of these to the rest of the dish is not enough anyways, but even if it had ten times more the taste would not change much. It is all so disappointing, but on a hopeful note, maybe they will add these necessary ingredients and get their food up to the level it strives to be.

Laphet thoke fermented tea leaf salad
Laphet thoke tea leaf salad ($12).

The most successful dish is the mohinga (below), a fish noodle porridge that is unfortunately only available on weekends at Bagan for now.

Do not leave it out of any Saturday or Sunday order if you are going to give them a shot.

Weekend mohinga
Mohinga ($14).

Nangyi thoke
Nangyi thoke ($12).

Egg curry
Egg curry ($12).

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I COULD USE YOUR HELP
Eat the World Los Angeles is and always has been free. It is a hobby born of passion and never solicits money or free food from restaurants. No advertisements block the content or pop over what you read. If this website has helped you explore your city and its wonderful cultures a little better please tell your friends about us and if you have the means to contribute, please consider doing so. Eat the World Los Angeles is a labor of love, but also takes a lot of money and time everyday to keep running.

Thank you!
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CASH APP: $JaredCohee
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Thursday, 20 January 2022

(SHEF) Chef Elizabeth

KENYA 🇰🇪
Delivered bags from Shef.com

COVID-19 UPDATE: Orders are delivered through Doordash and can be left at your house without contact if desired.

📍No Physical Address. This chef can be found through shef.com. If you use this link, you can get $20 credit and I will get $10. Eat the World Los Angeles has no affiliation with this website, and paid for this order in full.

For more about the chefs and cuisines available on shef.com, please read the article about Chef Ahlam's Palestinian/Jordanian cuisine from last week. For a second straight time, experiences with this website were rewarded with a real quality and good value set of meals.

When people talk about East African food in Los Angeles, over 90% of it is probably thanks to the wide variety of Ethiopian restaurants that the city is blessed to call its own. In Little Ethiopia and South Los Angeles, the cuisine is ubiquitous, while a smattering of restaurants are also spread throughout Southern California.

Full delivery order in containers

But there are a few other countries represented, with Eritrea also represented at Industry Café & Jazz, Somalia's last remaining spot in Inglewood, and a magical Ugandan home chef experience in Van Nuys. For a taste of Kenya, a trip can be made down to San Diego, or Chef Elizabeth can be found on this new (to LA) service.

This recent shipment came in six large containers but was way more than six meals for two people, each packed to the top with traditional Kenyan favorites.

Chapati lentil meal

Despite having to reheat everything since you are not visiting a restaurant, the meals all held up very well and were delicious. Make sure to order the chapati lentil meal ($9.99, above) to sample the chef's lavishly buttery chapati, best heated up in a pan rather than the microwave.

While vegetarian, the kamande (lentil stew) is thick and hearty and can be scooped up perfectly with the chapati. Three big pieces come with an order and are enough to fill all but the most hungry customers.

Snack platter: Turkey samosas and sausage rolls

The snack platter ($10.99, above) is a good look at a couple of the various food inspirations that have been injected into the country over the years. It includes four ground turkey samosas, with some toned down but delicious spices of South Asia and a chopped up sausage roll. This is surrounded by a flaky puff pastry and must show some culinary legacy from Kenya's colonization history from the British.

For a distinctly Kenyan treat, try the ugali beef collards meal ($12.99, below), which showcases the cornmeal staple of ugali. This is often called a porridge, but is extremely firm and should be used to pick up and enjoy bites from the other parts of the plate.

Ugali beef collards meal

Chicken in peanut butter sauce

Like their friends in West Africa, ground nuts and peanut stews are an important part of the diet and Chef Elizabeth makes an excellent chicken in peanut butter sauce ($12.99, above). This dish of chicken thighs is smothered in a sweet and savory creamy peanut sauce and accompanied by white rice and a side of pickled cabbage and vegetables that can be eaten separately or added for zip.

Githeri ($9.99, below) is another Kenyan staple consisting mostly of corn and beans. The chef uses pinto beans and small yellow corn, adds cabbage and potatoes and creates a tomato, garlic, and onion sauce that features the Kenyan Royco spice mix.

Githeri

While the history of githeri is as food for students for a century in Kenya because of easy access to its staple ingredients, the dish is also becoming more popular in trendy city restaurants and amongst young professionals. Tourists can always find a plate of githeri in their hotel restaurants, and will find it hard to visit Kenya without trying it at least once.

Finish off an order with a plate of crepes na mandazi ($10.99, below), which features the two items in its title. The crepe is wrapped tightly and dense and features fresh fruit on top, but even more exciting are mandazi, a fried bread invention of the Swahili people that is often referred to as a donut and enjoyed as a sweet treat at any time of day.

Crepes Na Mandazi

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I COULD USE YOUR HELP
Eat the World Los Angeles is and always has been free. It is a hobby born of passion and never solicits money or free food from restaurants. No advertisements block the content or pop over what you read. If this website has helped you explore your city and its wonderful cultures a little better please tell your friends about us and if you have the means to contribute, please consider doing so. Eat the World Los Angeles is a labor of love, but also takes a lot of money and time everyday to keep running.

Thank you!
VENMO: @JAREDCOHEE
CASH APP: $JaredCohee
PAYPAL: (no account necessary, use link)

Tuesday, 18 January 2022

Sipan Bakery

ARMENIA 🇦🇲
Glenoaks Blvd. facade

COVID-19 UPDATE: There are two tables for dine-in service, most business is pickup and takeout.


For such a small village, Sipan seems to be the namesake of a lot of markets and other businesses around town. Especially in Glendale, the name is seen on a butcher shop, a liquor store, and this bakery on Glenoaks Blvd. which used to have a second location in Northridge. But if you look for this word outside of the current internationally recognized borders of Armenia you find a much more likely answer: Mount Sipan, just north of Lake Van in what is now Turkey but still remains the heart of the Armenian Highlands to many.

The beautiful, often snow-capped peak is the subject of much Armenian art from over a century ago and for good reason. Views from across the lake and up the slopes of the rocky peak are naturally spectacular and seemingly made in the mind of whomever was Lake Van's Bob Ross equivalent. Back to Glendale, the art made inside this family-run bakery comes from the oven, with plenty of options for lahmajune, maneishe, and beorek.

Chicken shawarma pizza

If you have read the pages of Eat the World Los Angeles for long, you will be well-versed in the world's bakers also using their skills to provide their communities (and all Angelenos) with the styles of pizzas beloved back home. The Armenian-style pizza here is not so different than those enjoyed in Iran, which also drops the marinara or any other sauce in favor of more cheese.

Thankfully (sorry Persians!) they do not insist on using ranch dressing and ketchup on their pies, Sipan instead passes out a healthy amount of their homemade spicy chipotle sauce. This creamy, nutty sauce is the ultimate LA fusion and surprisingly addictive. It definitely lived up to its praise and was used to the last drop on the large chicken shawarma pizza ($15.55, above).

Beef shawarma plate with hummus and fries

Speaking of particularly Los Angeles fusions, there may be no more obvious one than Armenian tacos, which Sipan Bakery makes using round "tortillas" made from their thin lavash. Vegetarians will be very happy with the falafel taco, while other options include beef and chicken shawarma and lahmajune. No matter which you order, use plenty of the chipotle salsa.

For this meal it was the more traditional items that were desired to pair with pizza, so a beef shawarma plate ($16.09, above) was ordered. This comes with a few (rectangular) sheets of lavash, a bed of crispy seasoned fries, tahini, pickles, and a side of hummus. The dish has exactly zero weak parts and hit all the notes that were hoped for when it arrived.

Tabouleh

A small side of tabouleh salad ($8.27, above) is a great way to get some greens on the table, a fresh and crisp slap in the face with just the right amount of lemon juice. A small order is by no means small and was plenty to share between this table of four. Recommended.

While marinara is not on the pizzas and would probably not combine so well with shawarma anyways, they save it for orders of mante, available cooked or frozen in various sized trays. Frozen versions allow you to take the dumplings home to be heated up when desired and come with heating instructions by the chef and sides of both the marinara and a garlicky yogurt sauce to be put on top after baking.

Large 9" mante plate with sauces on side

A large 9" mante tray ($11.80, above and below) is basically a meal for two. Small beef balls are wrapped and concealed in a canoe-shaped boat and left open faced. When they are cooking, the fats from the meat start to boil out of the canoes and work to brown the edges of wrappers.

While it would certainly be enjoyable without anything on top, part of the reason Armenians eat mante is to consume a ridiculous amount of the garlic-infused yogurt, so be generous with that and if possible cancel your plans for later if good breath is going to be necessary.

Large 9" Mante plate with sauces on top

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I COULD USE YOUR HELP
Eat the World Los Angeles is and always has been free. It is a hobby born of passion and never solicits money or free food from restaurants. No advertisements block the content or pop over what you read. If this website has helped you explore your city and its wonderful cultures a little better please tell your friends about us and if you have the means to contribute, please consider doing so. Eat the World Los Angeles is a labor of love, but also takes a lot of money and time everyday to keep running.

Thank you!
VENMO: @JAREDCOHEE
CASH APP: $JaredCohee
PAYPAL: (no account necessary, use link)

Friday, 14 January 2022

(SHEF) Chef Ahlam

PALESTINE 🇵🇸
JORDAN 🇯🇴
Shef.com bags delivered

COVID-19 UPDATE: Orders are delivered through Doordash and can be left at your house without contact if desired.

📍No Physical Address. This chef can be found through shef.com. If you use this link, you can get $20 credit and I will get $10. Eat the World Los Angeles has no affiliation with this website, and paid for this order in full.

No matter where you live in the world, there will always be blind spots of cuisines you do not have access to on a daily basis. Even in the world's most multi-cultural cities like London, Singapore, New York City, Mexico City, and São Paulo, there are dozens if not hundreds of cultures that do not have representation in restaurant form. For that reason, it is often necessary to look to home chefs for a taste of certain foods.

Los Angeles is lucky to have so many types of food available, but also has many blind spots in the restaurant world. Small communities around town have filled these with WhatsApp groups, Instagram pop-ups, and even word of mouth at religious gatherings. Now a website founded in 2019 has expanded to Los Angeles and offers everyone the ability to peek into the kitchens of some talented chefs, fill a few blind spots in the city, and hopefully allow for a meaningful income for the people that cook.

Full order with quality packaging

The first foray into this website was rewarded with the bounty above, even sent with a thank you note from the chef. Shef.com currently uses Doordash to have their orders picked up from chefs and delivered, arriving in nice branded bags which can be returned and recycled for future order credit.

Meals are fully cooked but allowed to cool and come packed with ice, therefore nothing arrives over-steamed in its packaging. Instructions on each container show customers how to reheat everything in the microwave, but if you have the equipment and the know-how you will probably end up using pans or an air fryer for some items.

Mansaf, the national dish of Jordan
Mansaf and maqdoos.

Chef Ahlam credits her mother with teaching her everything, always a better source than a fancy school as far as Eat the World Los Angeles is concerned. The dish that initially stood out most on her menu was mansaf ($13.99, above), the national dish of Jordan that is also enjoyed throughout the Levant. The name of this dish means "large tray" and alludes to how it is normally served, a giant circular dish set in the middle of a table and shared by everyone.

Mansaf is defined by jameed, goat milk yogurt cooked with spices to make a broth. The lamb is cooked in this broth and a portion of it comes alongside the finished product to add as desired. Feel free to ladle as much or as little as you want. Parsley and almonds are packed separately but should not be forgotten as they add important final touches to each bite.

Lamb mandi
Mandi and hummus.

If you are a fan of lamb, you will also not want to miss Chef Ahlam's mandi ($14.99, above), another lamb shank served on a bed of basmati that has been cooked with the meat's stock. Each entrée is generous in its portioning and is at least two meals, making an order very economical.

There are an array of sides available from the chef as well like maqdoos ($4.99, shown above with mansaf), an unbelievably tart pickled eggplant dish and a creamy hummus ($6.99, above) that is perfect with just about everything. Do not leave out the qalayat bandora ($7.99, below), a delicious garlicky tomato side made with fried tomatoes and often eaten for breakfast. It works just as well to add to rice or enjoy between (or with) bites of lamb.

Maqluba with qalayat bandora

The last main ordered on this first round was maqluba ($13.99, above), a chicken dish named for the way it is served "upside down" after the meat, potatoes, and rice are all cooked together and flipped. If there was any flaw in the entire order, it was unfortunately the dryness of this cut of white meat, but the spices in it and the rice were enough for enjoyment when combined with potatoes and/or some of the sides

The chef calls her food both Palestinian and Jordanian and also has dishes like fasoliyeh beda, mujaddara, and musakhan, all beloved throughout the Levant. Another round to try out these three dishes and few more of the sides will have to be planned soon.

🇵🇸🇵🇸🇵🇸🇯🇴🇯🇴🇯🇴

I COULD USE YOUR HELP
Eat the World Los Angeles is and always has been free. It is a hobby born of passion and never solicits money or free food from restaurants. No advertisements block the content or pop over what you read. If this website has helped you explore your city and its wonderful cultures a little better please tell your friends about us and if you have the means to contribute, please consider doing so. Eat the World Los Angeles is a labor of love, but also takes a lot of money and time everyday to keep running.

Thank you!
VENMO: @JAREDCOHEE
CASH APP: $JaredCohee
PAYPAL: (no account necessary, use link)

Wednesday, 12 January 2022

LA Tofu House

SOUTH KOREA 🇰🇷
Vermont Avenue facade

COVID-19 UPDATE: The dining room is open.
 

Since the later days of summer 2020, Koreatown and Los Angeles as a whole has had a dolsot-sized hole in its heart, when long-lived and perennial favorite Beverly Soon Tofu had to close its doors for good. Many attributed BCD Tofu House to be the first in Los Angeles of its kind (even the wikipedia page gets it wrong!), and Korean tourists love to show up there for selfies, but Beverly was always the preferred place for those that wanted to focus purely on bubbling dolsot bowls of sundubu-jjigae.

A new place on Vermont Avenue, down the street from the now-closed first location of BCD, might not look like much on first glance but is trying to create an experience like no other from start to finish. Despite putting the focus in their name, the menu at LA Tofu House is packed with favorites from many sectors of Korean cuisine, but for now it was only the sundubu that was desired.

Fried fish served pre-meal

The similarities between this new restaurant and BCD are so strong that it is impossible not to talk about them, starting with the color and design of the menu. The numbering system is changed a bit, but the offerings are almost an exact replica. There is a well-used statement about imitation and flattery, but neither will be speculated upon here.

After a beautifully fried fish comes out to start the meal (above), and a good range of fresh banchan, it shows that LA Tofu House does actually care enough to succeed. One dish of spicy kimchi and another of non-spicy white kimchi are fresh and crisp, there was marinated spicy squid, bean sprouts, and fish cakes as well on this visit.

Kimchi soondobu

An equal amount of eggs also arrive matching the amount of bowl of sundubu-jjigae that will find their way to the table. These are of course to be cooked in the bubbling cauldron once it is placed in front of you, and if this is obviously your first time with the dish, someone will gently nudge you to do it immediately. Let it cook whole or mix it in depending on your preference, and be prepared to let everything cool down for quite a long time.

The kimchi soon tofu ($14.45, above) is always a solid option and is available with either pork or beef. Kimchi provides a bit of contrast to the smooth, silky tofu but does not outshine it like some other ingredients. The gochujang punch at the beginning is a soft blow, almost making the stew seem bland, but then builds on itself along with earthy peppers in each bite.

Dumpling pulled out of soondobu

Probably not freshly made in-house since their existence goes no further than one sundubu-jjigae option, the dumplings inside a bowl of dumpling soon tofu ($14.45, above) are quite tasty. They create a little bit more umami punch to go along with your selection of beef or pork.

Right about the time bowls of the main event show up, an equal amount of heavy stone dolsots will arrive with rice that has been cooked in them. The staff here will scoop out a portion for each customer from these for use while enjoying the sundubu-jjigae, and then pour tea into the bowls to let it soak in with the crisp rice grains that were stuck to the edges (see below).

Rice cooking with tea in stone pot (dolsot)

This creates the drink called sungnyung (below), which is eventually scooped out and presented to each diner. The rice is roasted and very slightly charred, the tastes of which make their way into the tea for the unique drink. It is meant to be sipped, but the rice itself is also such a pleasure to be eaten so you will probably find yourself scooping some out when no one is looking.

All in all it is a very pleasant meal from start to finish, with ingredients and ceremonies that are all taken care of with the highest regard. Future meals will come with more than two people so that side orders of galbi-jjim or seafood pancakes can be ordered and shared by the table.

Finished stone pot cooked rice with tea

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I COULD USE YOUR HELP
Eat the World Los Angeles is and always has been free. It is a hobby born of passion and never solicits money or free food from restaurants. No advertisements block the content or pop over what you read. If this website has helped you explore your city and its wonderful cultures a little better please tell your friends about us and if you have the means to contribute, please consider doing so. Eat the World Los Angeles is a labor of love, but also takes a lot of money and time everyday to keep running.

Thank you!
VENMO: @JAREDCOHEE
CASH APP: $JaredCohee
PAYPAL: (no account necessary, use link)

Monday, 10 January 2022

Beba's Restaurant

BOLIVIA 🇧🇴
Lincoln Avenue facade

COVID-19 UPDATE: The restaurant is fully open for dine in service and even has live music on weekends.


In cities of the United States with very large South American representation, there only ever seems to be a smattering of Bolivian food and people, as not nearly as many people have left that country to come here. Despite a nearby bakery in Santa Ana with salteñas and some Bolivian breads and another coffee shop in Van Nuys with more pastries and some full plates, Beba's in Anaheim has been the only full restaurant in Greater Los Angeles.

On weekends families from all drive-able distances descend on this over 25-year-old restaurant, piling out of minivans for large hearty plates of food and live music. The community seems tight knit even though they are spread out widely, coming together here at what could be considered the Southern California cultural center of Bolivia.

Full order

It might be difficult to find any Bolivian meals that do not include the country's unique and mighty salteñas ($3.99 each, below). These thick sweetened corn wrappers are full of soupy beef or chicken insides, and more sweetness from raisins, but are also deeply and satisfyingly savory. Its spices swirl with olives and potatoes and the meat of your choosing.

Be sure to bite into a salteña carefully, keeping it vertical so as not to lose the scalding juices waiting inside. These are prepared and baked in a special way, with all the meat and insides being frozen after cooking so that when the pastry is in the oven, the juices do not ruin the wrapper. Thirty minutes or so later, by the time the salteña is fully cooked, the insides are just right and ready to be slurped.

Salteñas

If you are a fan of soups made with hefty pieces of hominy, there will most assuredly be another to add to the favorites list when you try fricasé ($13.99, below). This hearty stew is simply called "pork stew" on the menu, but has pork ribs and other large chunks as well as some choice interior cuts. The distinct color comes from the Bolivian yellow ají, which also works slowly to build-up an intense but not killer heat as you progress.

While the broth may sometimes be thickened by breadcrumbs, it does not really need this as it is also full of potatoes and chuño, a black freeze-dried potato variety used by high altitude Quechua and Aymara communities in the Andes. Fricasé, for obvious reasons, has gained notoriety throughout Bolivia as an excellent hangover cure.

Fricasé

You can also get a taste for chuño with an order of the falso conejo ($14.99, below), an interestingly-named dish that translates to "fake rabbit." While preparations of rabbit these days look nothing like this dish of thinly-pounded and breaded beef, its history comes about from the meat substituting for rabbit that is prepared in similar ways to what was common at the time.

The meat is soft, pulls apart easily, and is served with an enormous amount of white rice, more potatoes, and chuño. You may see a variety of different salsas on top of this in other restaurants, but here they put a marinade in the beef and breading and top it with a variety of diced vegetables.

Falso conejo

What appears to be a tame tomato salsa is served on the side of most dishes and will probably arrive at the table at some point. Use this to add spice to your salteñas or other plates, but test drive it slowly at first because it definitely packs a lot more heat than it appears to.

While Bolivian foods do a pretty good job holding up for takeout and reheating, there is really no better experience than coming to Anaheim on the weekend to be surrounded by families and the pan flutes of traditional Bolivian music.

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I COULD USE YOUR HELP
Eat the World Los Angeles is and always has been free. It is a hobby born of passion and never solicits money or free food from restaurants. No advertisements block the content or pop over what you read. If this website has helped you explore your city and its wonderful cultures a little better please tell your friends about us and if you have the means to contribute, please consider doing so. Eat the World Los Angeles is a labor of love, but also takes a lot of money and time everyday to keep running.

Thank you!
VENMO: @JAREDCOHEE
CASH APP: $JaredCohee
PAYPAL: (no account necessary, use link)